om gam yoga

Melbourne yoga instruction by Sophie Langley

Tag: yoga in sydney

New Beginners’ Yoga Courses Sydney

I’ll be teaching two new beginners’ yoga courses in Sydney, starting next week. The classes will be held at the Yoga Factory in Camperdown, and will run for 8 weeks. The cost is $140.

Mondays
(starts Monday 11/06)
6-7.15pm

Wednesdays
(starts Wednesday 13/06)
7.45-9pm

If you’ve never done yoga before, or have taken a few classes but feel like you’re not entirely sure what you’re doing, beginners’ yoga courses are the way to go. Over the 8 weeks, we’ll learn the basics of yoga breathing, as well as some of the most common yoga poses, and hopefully by the end of the course you’ll feel more comfortable heading into a general class. You don’t have to be flexible to do yoga — I sure as hell couldn’t touch my toes when I started. The practice will help you build flexibility and strength, of course, but it will also teach you the way you a lot about your body and your mind work, and help you to manage the inevitable stresses we come across in general life.

I love teaching beginners’ courses. It’s such a wonderful opportunity for me as a teacher to see new students beginning to understand how their bodies work. And beginners often come up with the most interesting questions, because they’re coming at it with fresh eyes — and this means I learn a lot too.

Bookings are essential for these courses, so if you’re interested, you can book here. Alternatively, send me an email (sophie@omgamyoga.com), and I’ll book you in.

Promising Scientific Studies on Yoga & Health | Alison Hinks Yoga

I love Alison Hinks‘ infographics. Her latest shows some of the results of scientific studies into yoga and health.

(See Hinks’ original post here)

Yoga Music: MC Yogi

This is one of my favourite tracks to play during Savasana… or just in the evening while I’m getting ready for bed. It’s got just the right kind of calm-down energy.

MC Yogi: Shanti (Peace Out)

Abi and Joseph yoga clothes

I don’t normally post these kind of things on this blog, but I stumbled across this competition today, and would absolutely love to win some of these beautiful yoga clothes. I’ve become a little obsessed with finding the perfect pair of tights, or a top that works on the yoga mat and off. I like to joke with some of my friends that I’m always one step away from being yoga ready. Abi and Joseph have some really lovely stuff.

Abi and Joseph are Australian — and I’m all for supporting clever Australian people. Especially if they’re clever yoga-type people.

To enter this competition, I have to post up here a link to my favourite bits and pieces from Abi and Joseph. Easy! You could enter too.

I love tights. But Abi and Joseph have some other amazing yoga pants. Like these ones.

The tops are a little harder. There are quite a few good ones. But I’d like to win this one.

As for the camisole, well the classic one is my favourite.

And finally, I am a huge fan of non-slip socks. I prefer bare feet to feet in shoes, but in winter my toes get cold. Non-slip socks are the perfect solution. I can keep my feet warm but still tuck them underneath me comfortably.

If you’re in the market for some new yoga or pilates gear, it’s worth checking these guys out.

Yoga for Moving House

This last fortnight I’ve been using my Sydney yoga practice a little differently. I’ve been moving house. Reluctantly. As well as taking up all my time and energy, it’s been a sad experience for me.  The move was not a voluntary one – our landlord was returning from overseas and wanted to move back into her house. This house has been one of the best houses I’ve ever lived in; my housemates have become almost like family – and it’s the longest I’ve lived in one place since I left home all those years ago.

Unfortunately, it’s also taken up so many of my resources, material and otherwise, that my yoga practice has been substantially reduced. Again. It’s been frustrating.

Looking back through some of my Sydney yoga class plans, I came across one I taught on the theme of impermanence. The series of poses I’d chosen when planning the class seemed to accurately represent the process I felt I was going through moving all my things to the new house: physically demanding, alternately concentrating on balance, strength and letting go, and requiring high levels of concentration.

Patanjali begins the Yoga Sutras with this statement:

Atha yoga nushashanam

This translates as, “Now, here is yoga as I have observed it in the natural world.” Sanskrit is not a language in which there are superfluous words. Each word in this phrase is just as important as the next, including the word “now”.

Change and impermanence are a part of life. Moving house became a big, long extended reminder of this. As much as I am looking forward to new adventures in my new house, there’s also an underlying resistance to the change and a hesitation that I’m sure will take some time to fade.

But permanence is an illusion anyway, according to yogic philosophy. Everything is in a constant state of flux, and clinging to the idea of permanence will only cause us distress. My hesitation too will change.

The Buddha said, “This existence of ours is as transient as the autumn clouds. To watch the birth and death of beings is like looking at the movements of a dance. A lifetime is like a flash of lightning in the sky, rushing by, like a torrent down a steep mountain.” Buddhists argue that, because of the fragile impermanence in our lives, all we really have is right now. The “now” of Patanjali’s Sutras.

The brilliance of focusing on now is that it can both help you more fully enjoy moments of joy – make the most of them, because you cannot be sure how long they will last – and move through difficult times – they too will pass, you can focus on just getting through one moment at a time.

In a yoga class, we can practise what Buddhists call ‘mindfulness’. In any pose, we can draw our attention to any areas of tension, as well as any areas where we might feel more flexible. We can notice those parts of our body that are touching the ground, notice how the ground feels beneath our feet at that moment. If a pose is particularly difficult, I often tell my students to focus on their breath, making sure they can still breathe fully; all they need to do is get through that one breath. After that, all they need to focus on is getting through that next breath, and so on.

Of course, the same practice could apply to me, settling into my new house and moving through my sadness about the end of the old house. Over the next few weeks I’m trying to focus on unpacking just one box at a time. I’ve unpacked all the major things; the boxes that are left are me settling in, like I might slow my breath down gradually in yoga asana practice.

Yesterday I went for a walk around my new neighbourhood; on Saturdays there’s a farmers’ market just around corner from my house, I found a new strip of cafes, and some interesting streets.

The frustration of moving has given me a chance to try and take what I’ve learnt about impermanence and change on the yoga mat into my life in a new way. On my walk yesterday I also came across the type of opportunity that often presents itself with an unwelcome change: just up the road from my new house is a beautiful new Sydney yoga studio space.